• Alissa Raines, PharmD, BCPS, PGY1 Pharmacy Residency Site Coordinator, Advanced Clinical Pharmacist - Solid Organ Transplant

    Alissa Raines, PharmD, BCPS, PGY1 Pharmacy Residency Site Coordinator, currently maintains a clinical pharmacy practice within the Kidney, Liver, and Pancreas Transplant Program at Intermountain Medical Center. ​​

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    Dr. Raines serves as site coordinator for the PGY1 Pharmacy Residency, practices in the inpatient and ambulatory care abdominal transplant setting, and precepts pharmacy residents and students. Dr. Raines is the chair of the Residency Advisory Committee, and sits on the Transplant Process Improvement Committee.
     
    Dr. Raines received her doctor of pharmacy degree from the University of Utah. She completed an American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP)-accredited pharmacy practice residency at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, Texas. Dr. Raines received her board certification for pharmacotherapy in 2007. 
     
    Practicum Description And Goals
    The abdominal transplant program at Intermountain Medical Center began in 1983 when the first kidney transplant was performed at LDS Hospital. During this four- to six- week rotation, the patient population consists of those that receive kidney, pancreas, and/or liver transplants. We also follow patients with liver dysfunction prior to their transplants.
    Patients are followed longitudinally; therefore all medical sub-specialties are encountered in the intensive care unit, on the inpatient floor, and in transplant clinic. This interdisciplinary service includes transplant surgeons, transplant hepatologists, transplant nephrologists, mid-levels, nurses, transplant coordinators, dieticians, social workers, and pharmacists.
     
    Pharmacists interact with patients on a daily basis. The pharmacist completes detailed discharge teaching for all patients and facilitates. They also fill the patient’s pillbox after their transplant. The same patients are evaluated in follow-up appointments to help reinforce the content taught in the hospital. The pharmacist may also see patients in the clinic and teach groups of patients about medications prior to their transplant. Each patient in the liver clinic is evaluated by a pharmacist prior to the physician’s assessment.
     
    In addition to providing education for patients, the solid organ transplant clinical pharmacist provides education to the transplant team and hospital nurses regularly, participates at the weekly transplant multidisciplinary selection conference and pathology rounds, and collaborates with the team for protocol development and adherence.
     
    This practicum experience is intended to provide exposure to the management of kidney, liver and pancreas transplants, and hepatology patients. The resident will learn to integrate into the multidisciplinary transplant team. The practicum will familiarize the PGY1 and PGY2 resident with the roles a transplant pharmacist practices within transplant medicine, including clinical specialist, researcher, protocol development, and policy and procedure development.
    The pharmacy resident is responsible for identifying and resolving pharmacy related issues for all patients on the abdominal transplant service. The resident will also be responsible for being the primary preceptor for a student.  This rotation is teaching rotation and provides many opportunities for the PGY1 teaching certificate.   
     
    Contact Info:
    e-mail: alissa.raines@imail.org
  • Amie Hatch, PharmD, BCPS, Advanced Clinical Pharmacist, Emergency Medicine

    Amie Hatch, PharmD, BCPS, has maintained clinical pharmacy services in the Emergency Department of Intermountain Medical Center since October 2010.

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    Dr. Hatch obtained her bachelor of science degree from Brigham Young University and her doctor of pharmacy degree from Massachusetts College of Pharmacy in Worcester, Mass. She completed a PGY1 residency at Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, NY, and a PGY2 in Emergency Medicine at Sarasota Memorial Hospital in Sarasota, Fla. She became board certified in pharmacotherapy in 2009.

     
    Practicum Description And Goals
    The emergency medicine rotation at Intermountain Medical Center is designed to expose learners to the various roles of a clinical pharmacist in the Emergency Department (ED) setting and to build on prior knowledge obtained during didactic learning sessions and previous rotations. Some of those roles include providing pharmaceutical care to ED patients, making clinical interventions, supporting drug distribution, developing protocols, participating in research, teaching, educating ED staff, and representing the pharmacy in appropriate hospital committees.
     
    The Roy W. Elizabeth Simmons Trauma and Emergency Center is the busiest emergency department in the state with over 85,000 visits annually. It is one of three Level 1 Trauma Centers in Utah and is supported by Life Flight, Intermountain Healthcare’s air medical transport and rescue service. The Life Flight team brings highly specialized care to people wherever they are, stabilize them, and get them to the hospital for treatment as quickly as possible. Intermountain Medical Center is also a primary stroke center.
     
    The department contains 56 beds, including four trauma bays, two specially-designed psychiatric rooms, a separate entrance for hazardous material decontamination teams as well as a chemical isolation room for hazmat emergencies. All beds are designed for easy access, continual monitoring, and patient privacy protection. A dedicated elevator next to the trauma bays runs directly from the trauma rooms to the OR. Diagnostic services including CT scanning, angiography, and radiology are located near the trauma bays to reduce transport time. Patients arriving by helicopter land on the helipad directly outside the ED for rapid access to treatment. The ambulance bay has space for six ambulances.
     
    The ED is staffed by Utah Emergency Physicians, a private contracted group of approximately 80 ED physicians. Other members of the healthcare team include emergency medicine residents, medical students, nurses, critical care technicians, phlebotomists, EKG technicians, registrars, and social workers. The trauma team includes surgeons from many specialties, advanced practice clinicians, specially-trained nurses and technicians, respiratory and physical therapists, social workers, pharmacists, and ancillary service providers.
    Pharmacy services in the ED were implemented in October 2010. A pharmacist is present in the department daily from 12:30-11 pm and is present at all cardiac arrests, traumas, and strokes. From 7 am to 12:30 pm a critical care pharmacist responds to these situations. Outside of the these hours, the department is supported by central pharmacists.
     
    Contact Info:
    e-mail: amie.hatch@imail.org
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  • Bruce Leavitt, PharmD, BCPS, MBA, Assistant Director of Clinical Pharmacy Services, Intermountain Medical Center

    Dr. Bruce Leavitt is currently the Assistant Director of Clinical Pharmacy Services for Intermountain Medical Center.

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    He previously served as a clinical pharmacy specialist with the Solid Organ Transplant Program beginning in 1992. He has been with Intermountain since 1990.
     
    Dr. Leavitt maintains many committee appointments within Intermountain Healthcare: the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee, the Medication Cycle Improvement Group, and the Pharmacy Leadership Team. Within Intermountain Medical Center, he has appointments with the Medication Cycle Improvement Committee, Pharmacy Safety Taskforce, Clinical Pharmacy Leadership Team, Pharmacy Management Team, Nursing Practice Council, and Residency Advisory Committee. Dr. Leavitt served as the Intermountain Medical Center Site Coordinator for the ASHP-accredited pharmacy residency program from 2006-2011.
     
    Dr. Leavitt completed his bachelor of science degree in pharmacy at the University of Utah in 1990. He completed his doctor of pharmacy degree from Idaho State University in 2001 and became board certified in 2008. Bruce received an MBA from the University of Utah in 2013. 
     
    Contact Info:
    e-mail: bruce.leavitt@imail.org
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  • Danielle M. Carbajal, PharmD, Clinical Pharmacist, Newborn ICU

    ​Danielle Carbajal, PharmD, currently maintains a clinical pharmacy practice within the Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Intermountain Medical Center.

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    Her responsibilities include precepting pharmacy students and residents, providing pharmacy-related education to neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) and respiratory therapists (RTs), and lecturing on newborn and women’s health-related topics. 
     
    Dr. Carbajal completed her undergraduate training at the University of Utah. She received her doctor of pharmacy degree from University of California San Diego.   
     
    Practicum Description And Goals
    This four to six week inpatient critical care rotation will take place in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Intermountain Medical Center. The unit is a level 3 NICU with 48 beds contained in four pods. This interdisciplinary, teaching service includes neonatologists, neonatal nurse practitioners and physician assistants, nurses, respiratory therapists, neonatal dieticians, case managers, social workers, and pharmacists. The unit is divided into two teams: IMC 1 and IMC 2 with team 1 focusing on the sicker, more acute infants and team 2 caring for the older, chronic, “feeder/grower” babies. 
     
    The clinical pharmacy specialist in the NICU is responsible for ensuring safe and effective medication use of all patients admitted to the unit, but rounds with team 1 on a daily basis. In addition, the pharmacist collaborates with decentralized and centralized pharmacy staff; educates family members, physicians, nurses, and pharmacy learners; participates in the code blue process; and participates with the pharmacy/nursing unit-based medication policy and continuous quality improvement committees.
     
    This practicum experience is intended to provide exposure to the management of acute and chronic newborn disease states both in the preterm infant as well as term babies, and a  small introduction into women’s health and the effects of maternal disease states on the fetus. The practicum will familiarize the PGY1 and PGY2 resident with the potential roles a pharmacist may practice within neonatal medicine including clinical specialist, neonatal researcher, and policy and procedure development. The resident will learn to integrate as a pharmacist into the multidisciplinary neonatology team. 
     
    The pharmacy resident is responsible for identifying and resolving pharmacy-related issues for all patients in the NICU.
     
    Contact Info:
    e-mail: danielle.carbajal@imail.org
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  • Erin Stahl, PharmD, BCPS, Advanced Clinical Pharmacist, Internal Medicine

    ​Erin Stahl, PharmD, BCPS, has been a clinical pharmacist on the medical telemetry floor at Intermountain Medical Center since 2008.

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    In addition to patient care responsibilities, Dr. Stahl is an assistant professor of pharmacy practice at Roseman University of Health Sciences College of Pharmacy. She enjoys being able to precept and mentor pharmacy students as well as pharmacy residents. She has students year round to fulfill her responsibilities for both Roseman and Intermountain Medical Center. She participates on numerous committees at Intermountain Medical Center geared towards quality improvement, patient safety and improved clinical outcomes. She participates daily on teaching rounds with the internal medicine interns/residents and physicians. Her lecturing responsibilities include chronic liver disease, community acquired pneumonia, skin and soft tissue infections and osteomyelitis.
     
    Dr. Stahl completed her bachelor of science in Molecular Biology at the University of Wyoming. She was a pharmaceutical sales representative for Janssen Pharmaceutica for four years before returning to pursue her PharmD. She received her doctor of pharmacy degree from Creighton University after which time she completed an American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP)-accredited pharmacy practice residency at Exempla Saint Joseph Hospital in Denver, CO.  Her second year of residency, specializing in Internal Medicine, was also completed at Exempla Saint Joseph Hospital. Dr. Stahl earned her board certification for pharmacotherapy in 2011. 
     
    Practicum Description And Goals
    The 8th floor of the patient tower (T8) at Intermountain Medical Center is a 32-bed adult acute care unit. The 8th floor is home to an extremely wide variety of conditions afflicting medicine patients, all of whom have varying degrees of acuity. What differentiates the educational experience on T8 from many other resident rotations is the opportunity to participate in teaching rounds and be a valued member of one of the House Staff teams. This affords the pharmacy resident an opportunity to work closely with medical students, interns, residents, and their attending physicians. The average length of stay for patients on T8 is two to three days.
     
    The T8 clinical pharmacy staff provides a variety of services to our patients, physicians, and other allied health professionals. Listed below are a few of the services provided:
    • Medication order verification
    • Medication reconciliation on admission
    • A pharmacist to round with each of the House Staff teams
    • Participation in multidisciplinary care coordination rounds
    • Consult services for anticoagulation, pharmacokinetics, and diabetic management
    • Medication education including discharge, side effect profile and anticoagulation education
    • Drug information resource for nurses and physicians
    • Close collaboration with nurse manager and nursing educator to meet stringent quality standards and educational initiatives
    • Quality improvement initiatives with an emphasis on core measures and clinical outcomes
    Contact Info:
    e-mail: erin.stahl@imail.org
     
  • Jeff Olson, PharmD, BCPS, Clinical Coordinator; Ambulatory Care Pharmacy and Advanced Clinical Pharmacist, Clinical Pharmacy Anticoagulation Services

    ​Jeff Olson, PharmD, BCPS, currently maintains a clinical pharmacy practice within the Clinical Pharmacist Anticoagulation Service (CPAS) and serves as the Clinical Coordinator for Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Services at Intermountain Medical Center.

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    In addition to caring for anticoagulated patients across a five state area, Dr. Olson coordinates a team of eight ambulatory care pharmacists and additional support staff.
     
    Dr. Olson completed his undergraduate training at Snow College in Ephraim, Utah and his doctor of pharmacy degree at the University of Utah. He completed an American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP)-accredited PGY1 residency at Southwest Washington Medical Center (now Peacehealth Southwest Medical Center) in Vancouver, WA. Dr. Olson obtained his board certification in pharmacotherapy in 2008.
     
    Practicum Description And Goals
    This core longitudinal ambulatory care experience will take place in the Clinical Pharmacist Anticoagulation Service (CPAS). This pharmacist-run clinic serves over 1,000 anticoagulated patients across a five-state area. The PGY-1 experience consists of three core elements:
    • Longitudinal management of 20-25 remote-managed patients
    • Weekly in-clinic experience
    • Presentations and quality improvement projects centered on ambulatory care practice

    The clinical pharmacy specialist in CPAS is responsible for ensuring safe and effective medication management and education of all CPAS patients in a longitudinal manner; collaboration with decentralized and centralized pharmacy staff, physicians and nurses; education of patients, family members, physicians, nurses, and pharmacy learners; and participation with pharmacy department and clinic-based medication policy and continuous quality improvement efforts. The resident will autonomously serve as the primary care giver for anticoagulation management working under a collaborative practice agreement to prescribe anticoagulation therapy, order labs, and educate patients.

    This practicum experience is intended to provide exposure to the management of anticoagulation for a spectrum of disease states. The practicum will familiarize the resident with potential roles within ambulatory care pharmacy practice.
    Closely affiliated with both colleges of pharmacy in Utah, CPAS routinely has 3-4 students on rotation at a time. The resident will be responsible for being a preceptor for one or more student learners. This rotation is a teaching rotation and provides many opportunities for the PGY1 teaching certificate.   
     
    Contact Info:
    e-mail: jeff.olson@imail.org
     
  • Dustin Wagstaff, PharmD, BCPS, Advanced Clinical Pharmacist, Cardiothoracic ICU

    ​Dustin Wagstaff, PharmD, BCPS, currently maintains a clinical pharmacy practice within the Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit.

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    Dustin completed his undergraduate training at Brigham Young University and the University of Utah. He earned his PharmD from University of Southern Nevada in Henderson, NV. He completed his PGY1 residency at Intermountain Medical Center and his PGY2 critical care residency at the University of Utah. He currently works in the Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit at Intermountain Medical Center. 
     
    Dr. Wagstaff serves on multiple committees including the Pharmacy-managed Vancomycin Collaborative Practice Committee, Mechanical Circulatory Support (MCS) Antibiotic Selection Committee, Intermountain Medical Center Patient Safety Taskforce, and System-wide Critical Care Network.
     
    Practicum Description And Goals
    During the 4-6 six week rotation the learner will be exposed to a wide variety of post-surgical patients (e.g. CABG, valve repair and replacements, thoracotomies, vascular bypass, patients undergoing thrombolysis via tPA, patients on ECMO). The pupil will learn appropriate pharmacotherapy based on evidence based medicine for patients in this critical setting and serve as a resource for surgeons, intensivists, nurses, and mid-levels in regards to pharmacotherapy. 
     
    Specific goals of the rotation will be discussed with the individual learners; however, the main objective is to make the learner a self-motivated, knowledgeable, and a valuable asset to a multidisciplinary team, regardless of the practice setting. These can be achieved to a degree by accomplishing the goals listed below and a willing attitude of the learner.
     
    Contact Info:
    e-mail: dustin.wagstaff@imail.org
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  • Elizabeth Sebranek Evans, PharmD, BCPS, CGP, Advanced Clinical Pharmacist, Neuro Specialty Rehabilitation

    ​Elizabeth Sebranek Evans, PharmD, BCPS, CGP, currently maintains a clinical practice within Neuro Specialty Rehabilitation.

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    Elizabeth received her bachelor’s degree in Human Biology and doctorate of pharmacy from the University of Kansas.​ She completed her PGY1 residency at Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. After residency, she continued to work at Froedtert Hospital in the inpatient areas of neurology, adult internal medicine (focus on gastrointestinal diseases and chronic kidney disease), solid organ transplant, and emergency medicine. Dr. Evans moved to Utah in 2008 and started her career at Intermountain Medical Center on the Medical Telemetry (T8) unit, rounding with the hospitalist teaching teams. She moved to Neuro Specialty Rehabilitation (T12) unit in August 2010. On T12, she works as an advanced clinical pharmacist participating in multidisciplinary team rounds and precepting APPE pharmacy students and PGY1 residents. 
     
    Dr. Evans is a member the Intermountain Medical Center Residency Advisory Committee. She is also an Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice at Roseman University of Health Sciences at the South Jordan, Utah, campus, teaching in the areas of geriatrics, clinical pharmacokinetics, fluids and electrolytes, nephrology, gastroenterology, clinical nutrition, and pain management. She is a Board Certified Pharmacotherapy Specialist and Certified Geriatric Pharmacist.
     
    Practicum Description
    The twelfth floor in the tower (T12) at Intermountain Medical Center is a 24-bed acute rehabilitation unit. The patients on this unit are undergoing intensive speech, physical, and occupational therapy for medical conditions such as acute stroke, traumatic brain injury, miscellaneous traumas, or general deconditioning. The patients are managed by two physiatrists, Dr. David Ryser and Dr. Andrew Dodds, plus one nurse practitioner, Dave McComber. The average length of stay for patient on T12 is two to four weeks.
     
    The clinical pharmacy staff provides a variety of services to these patients including:
    • Medication order verification
    • Medication reconciliation at admission and discharge
    • Patient and family medication discharge education
    • Participation in multidisciplinary care coordinator rounds
    • Consult services for anticoagulation, pharmacokinetics, and diabetic management
    • Drug information resource for nurses and physicians
    • Quality improvement initiative
    Contact Info:
    e-mail: elizabeth.evans@imail.org
     
  • Emily Vigil, PharmD, BCPS,Advanced Clinical Pharmacist, Shock Trauma ICU

    Emily Vigil, PharmD, BCPS, currently maintains a clinical pharmacy practice within the Shock Trauma Intensive Care Unit (STICU) and serves as a co-chair for the Pharmacy Safety Taskforce. 

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    Dr. Vigil received her doctor of pharmacy degree from Skaggs School of Pharmacy at the University of Montana. She completed American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP)-accredited pharmacy practice residency at Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle, Washington, and her Post Graduate Year 2 (PGY2) critical care residency at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA. Dr. Vigil obtained her board certification for pharmacotherapy in 2012.
     
    Practicum Description And Goals
    This four to six week inpatient critical care rotation will take place in the Shock Trauma Intensive Care Unit (STICU) at Intermountain Medical Center. The STICU is an 24-bed unit. This interdisciplinary teaching service includes intensivists, pulmonologists, pulmonary fellows, medical residents/interns, medical students, mid-levels, hospitalists, nurses, nutritional therapists, case managers, social workers, and pharmacists.
    The clinical pharmacy specialist in the STICU is responsible for ensuring safe and effective medication use of all patients admitted to the unit and/or catheterization lab; collaboration with decentralized and centralized pharmacy staff; education of patients, family members, physicians, nurses, and pharmacy learners; participation in code blue process; medical emergency team response; emergency department full arrests; and participation with pharmacy department and nursing unit-based medication policy and continuous quality improvement committees.
     
    This practicum experience is intended to provide exposure to the management of critically ill adult patients. The practicum will familiarize the PGY1 and PGY2 resident to the potential roles a pharmacist may practice within critical care medicine, including clinical specialist and policy and procedure development. The resident will learn to integrate, as a pharmacist, into the multidisciplinary critical care team. 
    The pharmacy resident is responsible for identifying and resolving pharmacy related issues for all patients in the STICU. Specific activities for rotation are listed in section three of this document. The resident will also be responsible for being the primary preceptor for a student. This rotation is a teaching rotation and provides many opportunities for the PGY1 teaching certificate.   
     
    Contact Info:
    e-mail: emily.vigil@imail.org
     
  • Jared Neeley, PharmD, Clinical Pharmacist, Surgical Services

    Jared Neeley, PharmD, currently maintains a clinical pharmacy practice within the surgical services and coronary units for Intermountain Medical Center. ​

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    In addition to patient care, Dr. Neeley implemented the Pharmacist First order review at Intermountain Medical Center and several other hospitals in Intermountain Healthcare's Urban Central Region. His responsibilities include precepting pharmacy students and residents and lecturing on surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis, SCIP guidelines, and other preoperative care-related topics.
     
    Dr. Neeley completed his undergraduate training at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, UT. He received his doctor of pharmacy degree from Midwestern University in Glendale, AZ. He completed American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP)-accredited pharmacy practice residency at Scottsdale Healthcare in Scottsdale, AZ.
     
    Practicum Description And Goals
    The four week inpatient surgical services rotation will take place at Intermountain Medical Center. This interdisciplinary, non-teaching service includes cardiologists, mid-levels, hospitalists, nurses, case managers, social workers, and pharmacists.
     
    The clinical pharmacy specialist in the surgical services is responsible for ensuring safe and effective medication use of all surgical patients; collaboration with decentralized and centralized pharmacy staff; education of patients and family members, physicians, nurses, and pharmacy learners; participation in code blue process; and participation with pharmacy department and nursing unit-based medication policy and continuous quality improvement committees.
    This practicum experience is intended to provide exposure to the management of perioperative medication management. The practicum will familiarize the PGY1 resident to the potential roles a pharmacist may practice within the surgical services setting  including clinical specialist, and policy/procedure development. The resident will learn to integrate, as a pharmacist, into the multidisciplinary surgical team. 
     
    The pharmacy resident is responsible for identifying and resolving pharmacy related issues for all patients in the surgical units including same day surgery, the operating room, post op and post anesthesia care units. Specific activities for rotation are listed in section three of this document. The resident will also be responsible for being the primary preceptor for a student. This rotation is teaching rotation and provides many opportunities for the PGY1 teaching certificate.   
     
    Contact Info:
    e-mail: jared.neeley@imail.org
     
  • Jeremy Bair, PharmD, BCPS, Advanced Clinical Pharmacist, Emergency Medicine

    ​Jeremy Bair, PharmD, BCPS, has maintained clinical pharmacy services in the emergency department of Intermountain Medical Center since October 2010.

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    Dr. Bair obtained his bachelor of science degree from Weber State University and his doctor of pharmacy degree from Touro University California. He completed his PGY1 residency at Intermountain Medical Center and became board certified in pharmacotherapy in 2011.
     
    Practicum Description And Goals
    The emergency medicine rotation at Intermountain Medical Center is designed to expose learners to the various roles of a clinical pharmacist in the Emergency Department (ED) setting and to build on prior knowledge obtained during didactic learning sessions and previous rotations. Some of those roles include providing pharmaceutical care to ED patients, making clinical interventions, supporting drug distribution, developing protocols, participating in research, teaching, educating ED staff, and representing pharmacy in appropriate hospital committees.
     
    The Roy W. Elizabeth Simmons Trauma and Emergency Center is the busiest emergency department in the state with over 85,000 visits annually. It is one of three Level 1 Trauma Centers in Utah and is supported by Life Flight, Intermountain Healthcare’s air medical transport and rescue service. The Life Flight team brings highly specialized care to people wherever they are, stabilizes them, and gets them to the hospital for treatment as quickly as possible. Intermountain Medical Center is also a primary stroke center.
     
    The department contains 56 beds, including four trauma bays, two specially-designed psychiatric rooms, a separate entrance for the hazardous material decontamination teams, and a chemical isolation room for hazmat emergencies. All beds are designed for easy access, continual monitoring, and patient privacy protection. A dedicated elevator next to the trauma bays runs directly from the trauma rooms to the OR. Diagnostic services, including CT scanning, angiography, and radiology are located near the trauma bays, reducing transport time. Patients arriving by helicopter land on the helipad directly outside the ED for rapid access to treatment. The ambulance bay has space for six ambulances.
     
    The ED is staffed by Utah Emergency Physicians, a private contracted group of approximately 80 ED physicians who rotate through the hospitals in the Urban Central Region. Other members of the healthcare team include emergency medicine residents, medical students, nurses, critical care technicians, phlebotomists, EKG technicians, registrars, and social workers. The trauma team includes surgeons from many specialties, advanced practice clinicians, specially-trained nurses and technicians, respiratory and physical therapists, social workers, pharmacists, and ancillary service providers.
     
    Pharmacy services in the ED were implemented in October 2010. A pharmacist is present in the department daily from 12:30-11 pm and is present at all cardiac arrests, traumas, and strokes. From 7 am to 12:30 pm, a critical care pharmacist responds to these situations. Outside of the these hours, the department is supported by central pharmacists.
     
    Contact Info:
    e-mail: jeremy.bair@imail.org
     
  • Margaret A. Baldwin, PharmD, BCPS, Advanced Clinical Pharmacist, Shock Trauma ICU

    ​Margaret Baldwin, PharmD, BCPS, currently maintains a clinical pharmacy practice within the Shock Trauma Intensive Care Unit (STICU).

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    Her responsibilities include precepting pharmacy students/residents and lecturing on acid base abnormalities, arterial blood gas interpretation, and other critical care medicine-related topics. Dr. Baldwin is also involved with the Trauma Research Group at Intermountain Medical Center and the Pharmacy Safety Taskforce. 
     
    Dr. Baldwin completed her undergraduate training at Michigan State University and the University of Utah. She received her bachelor of pharmacy from the University of Utah College of Pharmacy and doctor of pharmacy degree from the University of Florida college of Pharmacy. Dr. Baldwin obtained her board certification for pharmacotherapy in 2010.  
     
    Practicum Description And Goals
    This four to six week inpatient critical care rotation will take place in the Shock Trauma Intensive Care Unit (STICU) at Intermountain Medical Center. The STICU is a 24-bed unit.  This interdisciplinary, teaching service includes an attending physician who is double board certified in critical care and surgery, a physician assistant and/or nurse practitioner, a clinical pharmacy specialist, a respiratory therapist, a clinical dietician, the nurse caring for the patient, case managers, social workers, and pharmacists.
     
    The clinical pharmacy specialist on the team is responsible for ensuring safe and effective medication use for all patients admitted to the team, including active participation in work and attending rounds daily; collaboration with the central pharmacist and pharmacy technicians to assure timely medication availability; education of patients and their family members, education of physicians and nurses, and education of pharmacy trainees; responding to the trauma 1 calls to the emergency department; responding to code blue calls and medical emergency calls in the patient tower; and participation on organizational, pharmacy department and nursing unit-based medication policy and continuous quality improvement committees.
     
    This practicum experience is intended to provide exposure to the emergent management of the trauma population.  The practicum will familiarize the PGY1 and PGY2 resident to the potential roles a pharmacist may practice within critical care trauma medicine including clinical specialist, trauma researcher, and policy/procedure development. The resident will learn to integrate, as a pharmacist, into the multidisciplinary trauma team. 
     
    The pharmacy resident is responsible for identifying and resolving medication therapy issues for patients and will assume care of all patients on the unit throughout the learning experience. The resident will provide and document therapeutic drug monitoring services for patients on their team receiving drugs requiring monitoring including, but not limited to, phenytoin, pentobarbital, phenobarbital, vancomycin, and aminoglycosides. Documentation must be completed on the day service was provided. The resident is responsible for providing and documenting education to patients on their team who will be discharged receiving anticoagulation. Education and documentation must be provided no later than the day of discharge. The resident is responsible for completing non-formulary drug consults, within 48 hours of the request.
     
    Contact Info:
    e-mail: margaret.baldwin@imail.org
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  • Nate Grossman, PharmD, BCPS, Advanced Clinical Pharmacist, Respiratory ICU

    Nate Grossman, PharmD, BCPS, currently maintains a clinical pharmacy practice within the Respiratory Intensive Care Unit (RICU). ​

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    He chairs the RICU Medication Safety Committee and is also a member of the RICU Executive Council. His responsibilities include patient monitoring, daily participation in multidisciplinary patient care rounds, precepting pharmacy students/residents, and lecturing on various respiratory critical care topics.
     
    Dr. Grossman received his bachelor of science from the University of Utah in 2000 and doctor of pharmacy from Midwestern University College of Pharmacy in Glendale, Arizona in 2003. He went on to establish a clinical practice in the RICU in 2005 and obtained his board certification of pharmacotherapy in 2007. Dr. Grossman has been appointed adjunct faculty at the University of Utah and Roseman University Colleges of Pharmacy since 2005 and 2006, respectively.
     
    Practicum Description And Goals
    The Respiratory Critical Care Unit (RICU) is a four week learning experience at Intermountain Medical Center. There are twelve RICU beds in the hospital, housed on the south end of the fourth floor of the main patient tower of Intermountain Medical Center.
     
    The unit is managed by critical care certified pulmonologists. The RICU is a closed unit primarily managed by the critical care interdisciplinary team. The team includes the attending physician, nurse practitioner, clinical pharmacy specialist, respiratory therapist, clinical nutritionist and bedside nurse caring for the patient. The resident is responsible for participating as a member of the RICU team by providing input for treatment planning, identifying and resolving medication therapy problems, and monitoring patient care outcomes (efficacy, safety, medication interactions, and financial implications). Good communication and interpersonal skills are of paramount importance in this setting. The resident must devise efficient strategies for accomplishing the required activities in a limited time frame.
     
    The clinical pharmacy specialist on the team is responsible for ensuring safe and effective medication use for all patients admitted to the team, including active participation in work and attending rounds daily; collaboration with the central pharmacist and pharmacy technicians to assure timely medication availability; education of patients and their family members, education of physicians and nurses, and education of pharmacy trainees; and participation in organizational, pharmacy department, and nursing unit-based medication policy and continuous quality improvement committees.
    The pharmacy resident is responsible for identifying and resolving medication therapy issues for patients and will work toward assuming care of all patients on the unit throughout the learning experience. The resident will provide and document therapeutic drug monitoring services for patients on their team receiving drugs requiring monitoring including, but not limited to, warfarin, insulin, vancomycin, and aminoglycosides. Documentation must be completed on the day service is provided. The resident is responsible for providing and documenting education to patients on their team who will be discharged receiving anticoagulation. Education and documentation must be provided no later than the day of discharge. The resident is responsible for completing non-formulary drug consults within 48 hours of the request.
     
    Contact Info:
    e-mail: nate.grossman@imail.org
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  • Paul Wohlt, PharmD, BCPS, Director, PGY2 Critical Care Pharmacy Residency; Clinical Coordinator, Critical Care Pharmacy; Advanced Clinical Pharmacist, Neuroscience ICU

    ​Paul Wohlt, PharmD, BCPS, is a clinical pharmacist and clinical coordinator for the critical care medicine pharmacy team at Intermountain Medical Center.

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    He received his doctor of pharmacy degree from the University of Wisconsin. He completed a PGY1 residency at the University of Utah and a PGY2 residency in critical care at the University of Wisconsin. He is also a board certified pharmacotherapy specialist. 
     
    Dr. Wohlt practices in the Neuroscience Critical Care Unit (NCCU) at Intermountain Medical Center and serves on multiple committees. He is a member of the Pharmacy Leadership Committee, the Nursing Pharmacy Medication Cycle Improvement Committee, Intermountain Medical Center Stroke Center Task Force, Neurovascular Medicine Critical Care Unit Quality Committee, and Intermountain Medical Center Stroke Unit Committee. He serves as a preceptor for pharmacy students and pharmacy practice residents at Intermountain Medical Center. Dr. Wohlt is also the director for the critical care specialty residency program at Intermountain Medical Center. 
     
    Practicum Description And Goals
    The Neuroscience Critical Care Unit (NCCU) is a required, four week learning experience at Intermountain Medical Center. There are 12 NCCU beds in the hospital, housed on the fourth floor of the main patient tower of Intermountain Medical Center.
     
    The unit is managed by the neurosurgical team and the neurovascular critical care medicine division with attending physicians double-board certified in critical care and neurology. The NCCU is an open unit primarily managed by the critical care interdisciplinary team and neurosurgeons.  The team includes the attending physician, a physician assistant and/or nurse practitioner, a clinical pharmacy specialist, a respiratory therapist, clinical nutritionist and the nurse caring for the patient. The resident is responsible for participating as a member of the NCCU team by providing input for treatment planning, identifying and resolving medication therapy problems, and monitoring patient care outcomes (efficacy, safety, medication interactions, financial implications). Good communication and interpersonal skills are of paramount importance in this setting. The resident must devise efficient strategies for accomplishing the required activities in a limited time frame.
     
    The clinical pharmacy specialist on the team is responsible for ensuring safe and effective medication use for all patients admitted to the team, including active participation in work and attending rounds daily; collaboration with the central pharmacist and pharmacy technicians to assure timely medication availability; education of patients and their family members, education of physicians and nurses, and education of pharmacy trainees; participation on the acute stroke emergency response team; and participation on organizational, pharmacy department and nursing unit-based medication policy and continuous quality improvement committees.
     
    The PGY1 and PGY2 pharmacy resident is responsible for identifying and resolving medication therapy issues for patients and will work toward assuming care of all patients on the unit throughout the learning experience. The resident will provide and document therapeutic drug monitoring services for patients on their team receiving drugs requiring monitoring including, but not limited to, phenytoin, pentobarbital, valproic acid, vancomycin, and aminoglycosides. Documentation must be completed on the day service is provided. The PGY1 and PGY2 resident is responsible for providing and documenting education to patients on their team who will be discharged receiving anticoagulation. Education and documentation must be provided no later than the day of discharge. The resident is responsible for completing non-formulary drug consults within 48 hours of the request.
     
    The PGY1 resident will be expected to appropriately manage all patients in the NCCU by the last week of the rotation while. The PGY2 resident will also be expected to manage all patients in the NCCU and will be provided autonomy to manage patients independently by the last week of the rotation. In addition, the PGY2 resident will be required to serve as a co-preceptor for pharmacy students and PGY1 residents. 
     
    Contact Info:
    e-mail: paul.wohlt@imail.org
    .
  • Russ K. Hulse, RPh, MBA, Director of Pharmacy Services, Intermountain Medical Center

    ​Russ Hulse is the director of pharmacy services for Intermountain Medical Center and for the other hospitals in Intermountain Healthcare Urban Central Region.

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    He is responsible for providing leadership, the provision of pharmacy services, and budget responsibilities for Intermountain Medical Center, LDS Hospital, Alta View Hospital, Riverton Hospital, and TOSH. He serves on Intermountain Healthcare’s Pharmacy Executive Team, Corporate Pharmacy P&T Pharmacy Compensation, Pharmacy Charge Practice Committee, Medication Safety Committee, Educational Programs Advisory Council, Sterile Compounding Committee, Pharmacy Residency Advisory Committee and Pharmacy Information Systems and Technology Work group. He implemented the ASHP-accredited pharmacy residency program for Intermountain Healthcare in 2003.

    Russ completed his pharmacy degree at the University of Utah in 1974. He then worked as a medical informatics system analyst and developed and implemented the first version of Intermountain Healthcare’s Pharmacy information system (Pharmacy HELP1). Russ received an MBA from the University of Utah in 1982. He completed the ASHP pharmacy leadership institute training in 2000 at Boston University. Russ also completed the Leonard Davis Institute’s Executive Management Program for Directors of Hospital Pharmacy at the University of Pennsylvania in 1994. 

    Contact Info:
    e-mail: russell.hulse@imail.org
    .

  • Travis Dick, PharmD, BCPS, MBA, Advanced Clinical Pharmacist, Solid Organ Transplant

    ​Travis Dick, PharmD, BCPS, MBA currently maintains a clinical pharmacy practice within Abdominal Transplant.

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    Travis received a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry with a minor in communication from the University of New Mexico followed by his doctor of pharmacy degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He then went to Duke University Hospital where he completed both a PGY1 pharmacy practice residency and a PGY2 residency in solid organ transplantation. He has since earned a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Utah. He maintains board certification in pharmacotherapy and has presented both nationally and internationally on transplant-related topics. His primary responsibility at Intermountain Medical Center is to serve as a solid organ transplant clinical pharmacy specialist where his particular clinical interests include immunosuppression, humoral rejection, and transplant infectious diseases. 

    Dr. Dick has a passion for research and teaching. His research has led to numerous scientific abstract publications and presentations. He has published full manuscripts in Transplantation Proceedings and the Journal of Forensic Sciences and serves as a reviewer for a number of peer-reviewed journals.  He serves as the chair of the Pharmacy Resident Research Committee at Intermountain Medical Center and mentors pharmacy residents in the research process. 

    Practicum Description And Goals
    The abdominal transplant program at Intermountain Medical Center began in 1983 when the first kidney transplant was performed at LDS Hospital. During this four to six week rotation the patient population consists of those that receive kidney, pancreas, and/or liver transplants. We also follow patients with liver dysfunction prior to their transplants. Patients are followed longitudinally; therefore all medical sub-specialties are encountered in the intensive care unit, on the inpatient floor, and in transplant clinic. This interdisciplinary service includes transplant surgeons, transplant hepatologists, transplant nephrologists, mid-levels, nurses, transplant coordinators, dieticians, social workers, and pharmacists.

    Patients become involved with the pharmacist through several means. In the hospital, all patients are evaluated by a pharmacist daily. The pharmacist also completes detailed discharge teaching for all patients and facilitates filling the patient’s pill box after their transplant. The same patients are also evaluated in follow-up appointments to help reinforce the content taught in the hospital. The pharmacist may also see patients in the clinic and teaches groups of patients about medications prior to their transplant. Each patient in the liver clinic is evaluated by a pharmacist prior to the physician’s assessment.

    In addition to providing education for patients, the solid organ transplant clinical pharmacist regularly provides education to the transplant team and hospital nurses, participates at the weekly transplant multidisciplinary selection conference and pathology rounds, and collaborates with the team for protocol development and adherence.

    This practicum experience is intended to provide exposure to the management of kidney, liver, and pancreas transplants and hepatology patients. The resident will learn to integrate into the multidisciplinary transplant team. The practicum will familiarize the PGY1 and PGY2 resident to the roles a transplant pharmacist practices within transplant medicine, including clinical specialist, researcher, protocol development, and policy/procedure development. 

    The pharmacy resident is responsible for identifying and resolving pharmacy related issues for all patients on the abdominal transplant service. The resident will also be responsible for being the primary preceptor for a student.  This rotation is teaching rotation and provides many opportunities for the PGY1 teaching certificate.   

    Contact Info:
    e-mail: travis.dick@imail.org
    .

  • Tyson Brooks, PharmD, BCPS, Advanced Clinical Pharmacist, Cardiothoracic ICU

    ​Tyson Brooks, PharmD, BCPS, practices pharmacy in the Cardiothoracic ICU at Intermountain Medical Center.

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    He completed his pharmacy practice residency at Methodist University Hospital in Memphis, TN, before coming to the University of Utah Hospital for his second residency in internal medicine. He has published original research articles regarding beta-blocker use in asthma patients and the treatment of hypertensive emergencies. His current interests include the use of clotting factors to control post-operative bleeding and reverse bleeding associated with anticoagulant agents.

    Practicum Description And Goals
    During the 4-6 six week rotation the learner will be exposed to a wide variety of post-surgical patients (e.g. CABG, valve repair/replacements, thoracotomies, vascular bypass, patients undergoing thrombolysis via tPA, patients on ECMO). The pupil will learn appropriate pharmacotherapy based on evidence based medicine for patients in this critical setting and serve as a resource for surgeons, intensivists, nurses and mid-levels in regards to pharmacotherapy. 

    Specific goals of the rotation will be discussed with the individual learners; however, the main objective is to make the learner a self-motivated, knowledgeable, and a valuable asset to a multidisciplinary team, regardless of the practice setting. This can be achieved to a degree by accomplishing the goals and by the learner having a willing attitude.

    Contact Info:
    e-mail: tyson.brooks@imail.org.

  • Whitney Buckel, PharmD, Clinical Pharmacist, Infectious Diseases and Antimicrobial Stewardship

    ​Whitney Buckel, PharmD, is the infectious diseases and antimicrobial stewardship clinical pharmacist at Intermountain Medical Center as of August 2012. ​

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    Dr. Buckel received her doctor of pharmacy degree from Purdue University in West Lafayette, IN. She completed her American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP)-accredited pharmacy practice and infectious diseases specialty residencies at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, MD.
     
    Practicum Description And Goals
    This four to six week inpatient infectious diseases rotation will take place at Intermountain Medical Center. The infectious diseases consult service takes care of patients throughout the hospital, including the medicine and surgical floors, intensive care units, cardiac units, and maternity wards. There will also be the expectation that 1-2 weeks of the rotation will be focused on antimicrobial stewardship initiatives.
     
    The infectious diseases clinical pharmacy specialist is responsible for ensuring safe and effective medication use of all patients followed by the consult service as well as those “signed off” patients who are still inpatients at Intermountain Medical Center; collaboration with decentralized and centralized pharmacy staff; education of patients and family members, physicians, nurses, and pharmacy learners; and participation in improving patient care activities as a part of the Antimicrobial Stewardship Program.
     
    This practicum experience is intended to provide exposure to the management of acute infectious disease states. The practicum will familiarize the PGY1 and PGY2 resident to the potential roles a pharmacist may practice within infectious diseases including clinical patient care and antimicrobial stewardship.
     
    The pharmacy resident is responsible for identifying and resolving pharmacy related issues for all infectious diseases consult and antimicrobial stewardship patients.
     
    Contact Info:
    e-mail: whitney.redding@imail.org
    .
  • Yenh Long, PharmD, Clinical Pharmacist, Clinical Pharmacy Anticoagulation Service

    Yenh Long, PharmD, currently maintains a clinical pharmacy practice within the Clinical Pharmacist Anticoagulation Service. 

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    Yenh earned her bachelor of science in biology at University of Nevada, Reno. ​She received her doctor of pharmacy degree from Roseman University of Health Sciences, formally known as the University of Southern Nevada and completed her PGY1 residency at Veterans Affairs of Southern Nevada. Dr. Long is currently an assistant professor of pharmacy practice at Roseman University of Health Sciences and provides direct patient care and precepts students at the Clinical Pharmacy Anticoagulation Service (CPAS) at Intermountain Medical Center.
     
    Practicum Description And Goals
    The core longitudinal ambulatory care experience will take place in the Clinical Pharmacist Anticoagulation Service (CPAS). This pharmacist-run clinic serves over 1,000 anticoagulated patients across a five-state area.
    The PGY-1 experience consists of three core elements:
    1. Longitudinal management of 20-25 remote-managed patients
    2. Weekly in-clinic experience
    3. Presentations and quality improvement projects centered on ambulatory care practice.

    The clinical pharmacy specialist in CPAS is responsible for ensuring safe and effective medication management and education of all CPAS patients in a longitudinal manner; collaboration with decentralized and centralized pharmacy staff, physicians and nurses; education of patients and family members, physicians and nurses, and pharmacy learners; and participation with pharmacy department and clinic-based medication policy and continuous quality improvement efforts. The resident will autonomously serve as the primary care giver for anticoagulation management working under a collaborative practice agreement to prescribe anticoagulation therapy, order labs, and educate patients.

    This practicum experience is intended to provide exposure to the management of anticoagulation for a spectrum of disease states. The practicum will familiarize the resident with potential roles within ambulatory care pharmacy practice.
    Closely affiliated with both colleges of pharmacy in Utah, CPAS routinely has 3-4 students on rotation at a time. The resident will be responsible for being a preceptor for one or more student learners. This rotation is a teaching rotation and provides many opportunities for the PGY1 teaching certificate.   
     
    Contact Info:
    e-mail: yenh.long@imail.org
    .
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