Park City Medical Center Earns ‘Stroke Receiving Center’ Designation from State of Utah

Amy Roberts

 (435) 659-1164

 amy.roberts@imail.org

 3/17/2010

Park City, UT (3/17/2010) – When minutes count, miles matter. That’s why Summit County residents will be happy to know their hospital is now a designated Stroke Receiving Center.

The Bureau of Emergency Medical Services and Preparedness recently surveyed Park City Medical Center and awarded the hospital this designation. This means area residents will now have more immediate access to care and no longer have to endure the commute to Salt Lake when in need of stroke treatment.

“Two million brain cells die every minute during a stroke attack, increasing the risk of permanent brain damage, disability or death. Eighty-five percent of strokes are caused by a blood clot that forms in an artery of the heart and goes to the brain. When the blood flow stops, brain cells begin to die,” notes Kris Kemp, MD. “Treatment options work best when started early, that’s why it’s so critical to get care as quickly as possible.”

Stroke attacks affect 780,000 people a year and are the third leading cause of death among adults. Up to 500,000 are preventable through better lifestyle choices like not smoking, exercising regularly, and eating a healthy diet.

Park City Medical Center is the only designated stroke-receiving center in Summit and nearby Wasatch counties, meaning the hospital’s team is “stroke ready” and can rapidly identify and treat patients. Resources are available 24/7 to manage stroke care.

For the public, this is paramount for preserving brain function and general health after a stroke.

Recognizing Signs of Stroke.

Most people do not know the symptoms of a stroke. Numbness, slurred speech, blurred vision, dizziness, and severe headaches are the most common.

The National Stroke Association has developed an easy way to remind people of the symptoms and how to respond: F.A.S.T. is a simple test to detect stroke symptoms.

  • F = Face – Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?
  • A = Arm – Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?
  • S = Speech – Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence. Does the speech sound slurred or strange?
  • T = Time. If you observe any of these signs, it’s time to call 9-1-1 for help.
Copyright © , Intermountain Healthcare, All rights reserved.