Nutrition Fact or Fiction

By Susan Blenner

​One of the top reasons people want to eat right is to be healthy. However, with allthe fads and nutrition myths it can be hard for someone to know what will work best.

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Food preferences, lifestyles, cultural and ethnic traditions and health concerns all affect our food choices. That is why, during National Nutrition Month® in March and now beyond, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics encourages everyone to "Eat Right, Your Way, Every Da​y”.

One of the top reasons people want to eat right is to be healthy. One of the most difficult things about being a Registered Dietitian is there are so many nutrition myths out there that it makes it difficult to educate the public.

Test your nutrition “smarts” by choosing FACT or FICTION for the following statements:

1. FAD DIETS WORK

Fact, with a significant “but”.  You may lose pounds quickly on a fad diet, but over the long term, you are unlikely to maintain that loss.  People who rely on fad diets to lose weight often return to their old eating habits and regain the weight.  Meanwhile, many fad diets require you to give up foods or entire food groups that most people need for good health.  The best way to reach and maintain a healthy weight is to develop an eating plan you can follow for life combined with regular physical activity.

2. FROZEN OR CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES ARE NOT AS NUTRITITIOUS AS FRESH

Fiction. In almost all cases, there is little nutritional difference between frozen or canned produce and fresh produce.  In fact, canned or frozen produce is generally processed at its peak, so it may contain more nutrients than fresh produce.  However, limit canned or frozen produce that contains large amounts of added sugar or salt.  Read food labels when purchasing these items.

3. EATNG TOO MANY CARBOHYDRATES CAUSES WEIGHT GAIN 

Fiction. Eating too many calories, from any source - carbohydrates, fat or protein – combined with an inactive lifestyle, will likely cause you to gain weight.  Make at least half of your grains whole grain for smarter carbohydrate choices. For example, choose 100% whole-grain breads, cereals, crackers, rice and pasta.

And get 30 minutes of physical activity most days of the week.

​For more nutrition information visit Intermountain Healthcare Nutrition Services