Immunizations (vaccines) are an important way to protect your baby from life-threatening diseases. Vaccines are among the safest and most effective preventive measures. Vaccines work best when they are given at certain ages, with some vaccines given over a series of properly spaced doses. They are started at birth and many are required before starting school.

The following table summarizes the routine early childhood immunization schedule as of 2006. This schedule is based on recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians, and the Centers for Disease Control.

Early Childhood Immunization Schedule

Age Vaccinations (# in series)
Newborn
  • Hepatitis B (1)
2 months
  • Hepatitis B (2)
  • DTaP (1)
  • Hib (1)
  • Polio (1)
  • Pneumococcal (1)
  • Rotavirus (1)
4 months
  • DTaP (2)
  • Hib (2)
  • Polio (2)
  • Pneumococcal (2)
  • Rotavirus (2)
6 months
  • Hepatitis B (3)
  • DTaP (3)
  • Hib (3)
  • Polio (3)
  • Pneumococcal (3)
  • Rotavirus (3)
12 to 18 months
  • DTaP (4)
  • Hib (4)
  • Pneumococcal (4)
  • MMR (1)
  • Varicella (1)
  • Hepatitis A (1)
18 to 24 months
  • Hepatitis A (2)
4 to 6 years
  • DTaP (5)
  • Polio (4)
  • MMR (2)
  • Varicella (2)
Yearly after 6 months
  • Influenza

DTaP = Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis
Hib = Haemophilus influenzae type b
MMR = Measles, Mumps, Rubella

When your baby is vaccinated, your healthcare provider should give you a Vaccine Information
Statement (VIS) for each vaccine your baby receives.

For more information about vaccines, visit the following websites:

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