Why Research is Important to the Intermountain Healthcare Mission

By Larry Hancock

We’re conducting approximately 600 research projects in the Urban Central Region of Intermountain Healthcare – Intermountain Medical Center, LDS Hospital, Alta View Hospital, Riverton Hospital and TOSH–The Orthopedic Specialty Hospital. There’s a simple reason why those projects are important to us: Because they’re important to the community. Research helps us improve the quality of the care we offer to the people who count on us for care.

Traveling Long Distances Increases Your Risk of Developing a Deadly Blood Clot

By Jason M Carlton

More people die from blood clots in the lungs than from breast cancer, prostate cancer, HIV/AIDS, and motor vehicle accidents combined. If you plan to travel long distances this summer, either by plane, train or car, you may be at increased risk to develop a deadly blood clot.

Would You Recognize the Signs of Medical Identity Theft?

By Intermountain Healthcare

What if your elderly aunt started receiving medical bills from a provider she’s never seen?  If you lost your wallet, would you think to call your insurance company to report your insurance cards as lost or stolen? What if you discovered a test result in your medical record that you never had done? Would you know what to do? Would you recognize the signs of medical identity theft?

Ways to Compensate for Low Vision

By Michael Allred PT
ways to compensate for low vision

According to the National Health Interview Survey (2011), 21.2 million American adults age 18 and older report experiencing vision loss. The term vision loss refers to individuals who report that they have trouble seeing when wearing glasses or contact lenses or are blind or unable to see at all.

How can I eat healthier at home?

By Kary Woodruff

As a dietitian I get asked a lot of questions about what people should eat or not eat. I often get asked about certain fad diets to know if they really work. With National Eating Healthy Day tomorrow (Nov. 5, 2014), I wanted to take a few minutes and provide answers to the five most common questions I get asked by patients, friends and family.