You Have My Permission

you have my permission to be healthy

If you have severe health problems or if you are planning a major change in your lifestyle, consulting with your physician to assure your body can handle that rapid change is a wise choice. However, there are plenty of small things we can change in our lives that can greatly impact our long-term health for good, without putting our short-term health at risk.

What to Expect in the Emergency Room

By John Resch
What to expect in an emergency room

No matter what, visiting an emergency room is a stressful experience. Staff members strive to do everything possible to make patients feel safe and comfortable. However, there are eight tips everyone should understand to help an ER visit go as smoothly as possible:

Deep Brain Stimulation helps Parkinson's patient gain control of his body

By Jason M Carlton
Parkinsons_DBS_Patient_Photo

Reggie, who was diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease in 2007, had heard about deep brain stimulation, or DBS, in which neurosurgeons implant electrical leads into the brain. Those leads are then connected to a small device called a neurostimulator, placed in the patient’s chest, which gives off electrical pulses that correct the misfirings in the brain that cause Parkinson’s symptoms.

Helping New Graduates Stay Safe – And Their Parents Stay Sane – This Graduation Season

By Laura Klarman
graduation_safe_teen_Parent_high_school

For high school graduation, both parents and their newly “adult” children are at a crossroads. Parents are worried about their kids driving around at all hours of the night, not knowing where they are or what they’re doing.  Graduates are worried about their future – losing touch with friends and entering the “real world.”

A Stroke Can Strike Anyone at Any Age. Here's the Warning Signs and 4 Ways to Reduce Your Risk

By Brady White
StrokeBEFAST

Stroke is the third-leading cause of death in the United States, and perhaps more importantly, it is the leading cause of long-term disability. It happens when blood flow to part of your brain suddenly stops, either because a blood clot blocks a blood vessel in the brain, which is called an ischemic stroke, or because a blood vessel in your brain bursts, referred to as a hemorrhagic stroke.