Trick or treating alternatives for teens

Trick or treating alternatives for teens

There’s a time in every child’s life when they no longer want to trick-or-treat on Halloween. Maybe it’s when they turn 13 and the lady next door tells them they’re too old to be asking for candy, or maybe your 11-year-old is giving into peer pressure to stop the fun. Whatever the reason, when your child’s trick-or-treating days are finished it’s time to find new activities for your teenager to do on Halloween. If you don’t help them plan something, your teen may end up wandering the streets on Halloween without a plan. Instead, try these five fun alternatives.

Pass out candy

It might surprise you, but your teenager might love passing out Halloween candy to local trick-or-treaters. Have them dress up, help decorate your home, and spook out trick-or-treaters who come to the door. You could even give your teen free-reign to create a haunted house or a fun setup to greet younger kids who come knocking for treats. 

Host a Halloween party

Instead of wondering what your teenager is out doing on Halloween, bring the party home. Host a Halloween party for your teen and all of their friends. Encourage everyone to dress up. Play spooky music. Lay out the spookiest of treats. Play games and encourage fun.

Watch a scary movie

Turn out the lights and put on a scary movie or two. Go as scary (or mild) as you and your teen can handle. Dig into the candy bowl and enjoy jumping at the scary parts together. Don’t be ashamed if you cover your eyes during the scary parts. 

Haunted progressive dinner

Does your teen have a group of friends who’d be willing to participate in a progressive dinner? At one home they could have appetizers, the next a salad, and so on. The time it takes to travel from one home to another will add to the fun of this activity for your teen and their friends. 

Volunteer

Halloween doesn’t have to be just fun and games for your teenager. Encourage them to volunteer in the community. There are many service opportunities on Halloween. Whether they volunteer at a haunted house, fall festival, or soup kitchen, it’ll be good for your teen and good for the community they serve.

Are you worried about what your teenager will do when they give up trick-or-treating? It’s natural to wonder if they’ll roam the streets with friends who will toilet paper homes, smash pumpkins, or terrorize little kids. Instead of letting your kids fill their time with whatever seems fun in the moment, take control of the situation by helping your teen plan a fun, safe Halloween with friends. From parties and progressive dinners to volunteering and passing out candy, your teen can have a fun and mischief-free Halloween.