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Women's health

Gynecology

Pregnancy and baby

Breast health

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Parents looking at their baby sleeping on a bed

Immunization schedule for newborns

Immunizations (vaccines) are among the safest and most effective measures we have against life-threatening diseases. Vaccines work best when given at certain ages, with some vaccines given over a series of properly spaced doses.

Our immunization schedule

We follow the early childhood immunization schedule recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians, and the Centers for Disease Control.

Newborn

Hepatitis B (first)

  • Hepatitis B (second)
  • DTaP (first)
  • Hib (first)
  • Polio (first)
  • Pneumococcal (first)
  • Rotavirus (first)

  • DTaP (second)
  • Hib (second)
  • Polio (second)
  • Pneumococcal (second)
  • Rotavirus (second)

  • Hepatitis B (third)
  • DTaP (third)
  • Hib (third)
  • Polio (third)
  • Pneumococcal (third)
  • Rotavirus (third)

  • DTaP (fourth)
  • Hib (fourth)
  • Pneumococcal (fourth)
  • MMR (first)
  • Varicella (first)
  • Hepatitis A (first)

  • Hepatitis A (second)

  • DTaP (fifth)
  • Polio (fourth)
  • MMR (second)
  • Varicella (second)

  • DTaP (fifth)
  • Polio (fourth)
  • MMR (second)
  • Varicella (second)

Support and resources on immunizations